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jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
, not necessarily. you will see and hear from people that would make the argument that egypt's stability in having tranquil domestic stability inside egypt is paramount for egypt to play the role that it can play in the region. when we saw in the past week egypt rise to the forefront of mediating between israel and the palestinian factions, it was because egypt at that particular point was not -- president morrissey's hand to put leverage on them. it's a political organization from which mohammed morsi comes from. stability will have long term and regional implications for all of the issues. but in terms of immediate truce, right now it is about what's happening on the ground be in gaza and right now that is not necessarily directly linked. >> all right, everyone. we were listening there to nbc's ayman and we're taking satellite hits. this conflict is raising a question concerning security in the middle east. the role iran played with arming hamas and its own stand offwith israel. joining me is dennis ross of the washington institute for institutional policy. dennis, welcome. let's talk about the
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
write the link between hamas and the muslim brotherhood is a concern. how vital is egypt's role given that in the gaza conflict right now? we know they're meeting right now. >> i think egypt is the key. they're the pivot here. what we're seeing is a situation where egypt really does not want to be put in a position where israel goes in to gaza. if that's the case, then the pressure is from within egypt from the muslim brotherhood, from the population, are going to be very intense. the last thing egypt wanted to do as a time when it needs to correct and deal with tremendous economic challenges is to be in a situation where if it threatens the peace treaty with israel, it guarantees it loses all the assistance from the outside. so they have a relationship with hamas because the muslim brotherhood and hamas are basically one in the same. hamas is on outgrowth of the egyptian muslim brotherhood. on the one hand, there's a link, there's a psychological connection, there's an emotional connection. on the other hand, they're the seen yore partner and hamas is a junior partner. the last thing
situations in the middle east. angry protests against an apparent power grab in egypt while there are new concerns about a break in the israeli gaza cease fire. meanwhile, back here after the holiday weekend ends, the fiscal cliff negotiations will heat up. now the speaker of the house has thrown a new problem into the talks, can a deal actually be reached? >>> shoppers looking for their own kind of grand bargain today. we're going to look at the black friday crush at shopping malls and super stores all over this country. but we start this hour with breaking news in egypt. you're looking at live pictures of tahrir square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying
that they will continue to play that role. the bigger problem is that this occupation is not egypt's fault. it is israel's fault. and it's unreasonable to expect egypt or turkey or any other country to put pressure on palestinians. what should be done instead is quite the opposite. the united states is the largest funder of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks
parties brokered by the united states and egypt. however, you saw the exiled leader of hamas say that as long as egypt abides by this agreement, we will, too. but if they don't, our finger is on the trigger, and you have seen palestinian terrorists in the past defy agreements like this. so it is very fragile at this point. >> one of those splinter groups. and listen, even hillary clinton has cautioned this is not over yet. let's listen. >> every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace for all the people of the region. there is no substitute for a just and lasting peace. >> jonathan, do you think the president's going to make a long-term peaceful resolution part of his second term goals? >> well, you know, he may try to do that. i tend to be a pessimist. but that's likely to happen. having seen so many failed attempts in the past. one of the really interesting things about this is, of course, the agreement is tenuous, but there's also a lot of talk from experts about the role of iran, in potentially supplying the rockets to hamas. and that could play an interesting role in
, the newly installed president of egypt, mohamed morsi, trying to encourage them to engage with hamas. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come to some sort of solution so cooler heads can prevail, mara. >> one of the things in terms of the political issue here, the president in the past has been criticized for not being strong enough in his support of israel. do you get the response in washington that his response now is significant in satisfying people who would like for him to express stronger support for israel? >> you know, there has been some controversy, some tension, frankly, between prime minister netanyahu and the president. that's no secret. there was the recent episode where the prime minister went before the united nations andrew that red line, you remember, across that little cartoon bomb. some disagreement about when and where that red line should be drawn with respect to iran's nuclear program. but look, there is no question that a
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
the weapons to egypt and hold the egyptian government responsible for hamas abide big the truce. so it is not about what both sides don't want, because they both want to avoid war, but what they want to come out of this appearing victorious or at least gained within their own political frameworks, and this is what is difficult for the egyptian media to bring these two sides together. >> thank you, so much from gaza. be safe. >>> and now to the middle east where president obama is now in cambodia, the third and the final stop on a multiday and multicountry tour. the president arrived in cambodia at 5:00 a.m. eastern time, and becoming the first sitting u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobod
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
's strategic interest, is also important to egypt. they have a very difficult time in economic terms, and let's not forget that the revolution there was indigenous, it was local and it was, in large part, over domestic issues, jobs, education, health care, what concerns people everywhere. he needs a stable situation there. he needs to concentrate on economic growth, providing jobs. he obviously has to recognize and acknowledge public opinion, which is an important factor there as here. but, for now, i think it's a positive step. what he's done with respect to the ceasefire. >> you saw a reporter in gaza who talked about the many celebrations throughout the day on thursday there. has hamas emerged stronger from this last eight days of the conflict? there are those who suggest that's the case? >> clearly, yes. and a dangerous signal is being sent throughout the entire region. palestinians are split. the palestinian authority, which controls the executive branch of government as a result of their election several years ago, is opposed to violence. they took the position we favor, nonviolent nego
. >> and there is the concern of how egypt will react. what is the word there on how they are reacting? >> well, we already heard from egypt's president and the foreign minister. they have condemned the emergency meeting in the arab league to explore popular options. egypt says it will open the border with gaza to completely allow all wounded and injured and anybody else who wants to get out. we are getting initial reports that the prime minister may be leading a high delegation visit tomorrow. that would be unprecedented given the security situation here. >> a ayman, thank you so much. appreciate it. from the middle east to back home. let's take a look at what is happening this hour. the president will land in new york city within the next 30 minutes, where he will tour the damage done by superstorm sandy. he will be greeted by andrew cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with the house intelligence committee and the the other with the house foreign affairs committee. there are new developments on th
of the cease fire on wednesday. they say they will complain to egypt. they will not take any further action. they are citing this as an example of how israel is not to be trusted to uphold the truth. >> that is one side. i'm going to bring you in, martin. what is the israeli military saying about the situation? >> reporter: well, the prime minister's office is saying they're examining what happened. the military says that there was about 300 palestinians approached the fence and that they we they were shouting slogans. one was shot. there were several locations along the length of the fence. they haven't said -- israelis have not yet said officially what they believe happened. they said they're investigating. the issue, of course, is that that no go area which was declared a no go area by israel several years ago specifically because there were so many incidents like this, they wanted to prevent be occasions where the palestinians approached the fence where terrorists were laying land mines along the fence, also shooting israeli's across the border. they were trying keep the 300 yard no go
or the cia felt at that point that this was a protest as a result of what happened with the film with egypt. he clarified that after more information came in, there was not a protest. >> general petraeus' testimony comes today the morning after cia acting director michael morell and james clapper the director of national int intelligence went before members of congress in two other hearings and hours after attorney general eric holder defended the decision not to bring members of congress into the loop sooner. >> we follow the facts. we do not share outside the justice department, outside the fbi the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. >> let's jump right in and bring in our friday morning political power panel. we have jackie kucinich political reporter for "usa today", democratic strategist blake zeb and msnbc contributor robert trainum. great to have you all here. we just heard from congressman king earlier today saying the general was asked right off the top whether the affair ha
guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel and hamas, getting bogged down in details. apparently, at least according to egyptian sources, they haven't yet been able to bridge differences. it's really unclear whether secretary clinton is carrying any specific proposals or if is she's here basically to nudge both sides into some kind of a compromise. but her presence here does give both sides the respected international i'd say political heavyweight to talk to, which certainly can't hurt. according to egyptian sources again, the main sticking point as we understand it seems to be over hamas' key demand, and it's not a surprising one, that that six-year-old blockade of gaza be lifted when the truce goes into effect. israel is balking at that. it reportedly is saying while it agrees with the principle of lifting the siege eventually, it does not agree with the timin
as egypt takes the lead. [ male announcer ] introducing the new dell xps 12. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ >>> welcome back, everyone. i'm alex witt. some of the stories making headline on thanksgiving day. a new study in the new england journal of medicine claims routine use of mammograms may have led to 1.3 million women being incorrectly diagnosed or overdiagnosed with breast cancer in the past 30 years. the latest study cast skepticism on the effectiveness of the test. one-third of women diagnosed with breast cancer would not have developed the full-blown disease if left untreated. >>> two weeks after winning his tenth term in congress, jesse jackson jr. resigned. jackson cited his ongoing treatment for bipolar disorder and admitted to, quote, my share of mistakes. jackson's resignation amid a committee vegs into dealings with impressined former governor blah voi given. >>> the violence in syria continues. rebel leaders say 40 people killed in an air strike on a key hospital in the city of aleppo. this is not the first time the
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)